THR

Tobacco Harm Reduction

stop

This is the truth about tobacco taken directly from the CDC website ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ) below. Its time you quit smoking tobacco products. We have everything you need to help you live a healthier life.

Diseases and Death

Tobacco use leads to disease and disability.

  • Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases (including emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airway obstruction), and diabetes.1
  • For every person who dies from a smoking-related disease, about 30 more people suffer with at least one serious illness from smoking.1
  • More than 16 million Americans suffer from a disease caused by smoking.1

 

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death.

  • Worldwide, tobacco use causes more than 5 million deaths per year, and current trends show that tobacco use will cause more than 8 million deaths annually by 2030.2
  • Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, including an estimated 41,000 deaths resulting from secondhand smoke exposure.1 This is about one in five deaths annually, or 1,300 deaths every day.1
  • On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers.3
  • If smoking persists at the current rate among youth in this country, 5.6 million of today’s Americans younger than 18 years of age are projected to die prematurely from a smoking-related illness. This represents about one in every 13 Americans aged 17 years or younger who are alive today.1

Costs and Expenditures

The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars each year on cigarette advertising and promotions.4

  • $8.4 billion total spent in 2011
  • Almost $23 million spent every day in 2011

 

Tobacco use costs the United States billions of dollars each year, including:1

  • More than $289 billion a year, including at least $133 billion in direct medical care for adults and more than $156 billion in lost productivity
  • $5.6 billion a year (2006 data) in lost productivity from exposure to secondhand smoke

 

State spending on tobacco prevention and control does not meet CDC-recommended levels.1,5,6

  • Collectively, states have billions of dollars available to them—from tobacco excise taxes and tobacco industry legal settlements—for preventing and controlling tobacco use. States currently use a very small percentage of these funds for tobacco control programs.
  • In fiscal year 2014, states will collect $25.7 billion from tobacco taxes and legal settlements, but states will spend only 1.9% of the $25.7 billion on prevention and cessation programs.
  • No states currently fund tobacco control programs at CDC’s “recommended” level. Only two states (Alaska and North Dakota) fund tobacco control programs at the “minimum” level.
  • Investing less than 15% (i.e., $3.3 billion) of the $25.7 billion would fund every state tobacco control program at CDC-recommended levels.

Cigarette Smoking in the United States

Percentage of U.S. adults aged 18 years or older who were current cigarette smokers in 2012:7

  • 18.1% of all adults (42.1 million people): 20.1% of males, 14.5% of females
  • 21.8% of non-Hispanic American Indians/Alaska Natives
  • 19.7% of non-Hispanic Whites
  • 18.1% of non-Hispanic Blacks
  • 12.5% of Hispanics
  • 10.7% of non-Hispanic Asians (excluding Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders)
  • 26.1% of multiple race individuals

Notes:

  • Current smokers are defined as persons who reported smoking at least 100 cigarettes during their lifetime and who, at the time of interview, reported smoking every day or some days.

 

Thousands of young people start smoking cigarettes every day1

  • Each day, more than 3,200 persons younger than 18 years of age smoke their first cigarette.
  • Each day, an estimated 2,100 youth and young adults who have been occasional smokers become daily cigarette smokers.

 

Many adult cigarette smokers want to quit smoking.

  • In 2011:1
    • 68.9% of adult smokers wanted to stop smoking
    • 42.7% had made a quit attempt in the past year